Creative Business Technologies Blog

Windows Alert – Security Patches

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Microsoft Announces Security Flaws in Internet Explorer and Windows Defender

Install the Emergency Patch to Help You Stay Protected

What is Happening?

In a rare move, Microsoft is urging Windows users to install an emergency out-of-band patch via Windows Update to address a security flaw affecting Internet Explorer versions 9, 10, and 11. Microsoft verified that the flaw is actively being exploited and could allow a cybercriminal to run malicious code on an affected PC.

Microsoft also announced a flaw in Defender, its built-in malware scanner. If the flaw were exploited, it could trigger a denial-of-service condition, potentially resulting in app failure.

What Should You Do?

Although Norton offerings can help protect customers against security threats such as malware, it’s important that users install recommended patches. When prompted, allow the Windows Update to run on your device. Or, manually run a Windows update.

*Courtesy of the Symantec Corporation.

Please contact us at 1-800-871-9683 for more information. Our email address is: markhuffman@creativebusinesstechnologies.com

Urgent – Windows 7 Support Ends on January 14th, 2020

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Microsoft will be ending all support and software patches, including security patches, for Windows 7 and Windows Server 2008 R2 on January 14th, 2020. What this means that your PCs with Windows 7 and Servers with Windows Server 2008 R2 will be vulnerable to viruses, spyware and malware attacks. This can cause a great deal of problems and down time, costing your company both lost productivity and revenue. If you have Windows 7 PCs or Laptops or Windows Servers 2008 R2, please contact us as soon as possible.

It is recommended that your equipment be upgraded and use the Operating System Windows 10 and use Microsoft Office 365 for your office platform. Feel free contact us if you have any questions or require assistance.

Call us at (800) 871-9683 or Email markhuffman@creativebusinesstechnologies.com to get more information on bringing your systems current today

Cloud Computing – how will it affect you?

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Cloud Computing – how will it affect you?

We are always on the watch for the ‘next best thing’ when it comes to technology and the Internet. Certainly no one can doubt that Cloud Computing and the next generation of the Internet has had a dramatic effect on how people interact and connect with each other – both from an individual standpoint and a business one.*

The hottest emerging concept that has the power to change how we perform tasks is taking place before us – and it is Cloud Computing. Simply put, it is the ability to use resources and tools via the Internet without actually owning or being near them. The only requirement is to be able to access them.

The term ‘Cloud’ is used to indicate the whole of computing services accessible via the Internet. It is an all-encompassing description of the complex internet-connected networks that exist in datacenters all over the world that power services and applications behind the scenes.

The concept of utilizing resources in these networks is being adopted by businesses both large and small. These resources are categorized to describe their function, and include:

1.       Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS)
2.       Platform as a Service (PaaS)
3.       Software as a Service (SaaS)
4.       Web 2.0

In the most general terms, Infrastructure as a Service means that companies may no longer need to own and house their own back-end servers and other network computing infrastructure besides an internet-connected PC or laptop in order to maintain business functionality. This capability can be purchased on a subscription basis from entities that market these services in a ‘virtual’ manner. This allows businesses to keep their costs low by not having to purchase, maintain and recycle their own equipment for this purpose, and also mitigates the possibility of business interruption due to the highly available nature of these solutions. This equates to increased uptime and profitability for Infrastructure as a Service customers.

Platform as a Service is also known as ‘cloudware’, and refers to the availability of development tools in creating web applications and services to the end user. Like IaaS, you never ‘see’ the inner-workings of this environment unless you are a computer programmer or IT resource, but it exists nonetheless and again affords those who use these tools the ability to reduce costs while running their businesses.

Software as a Service is defined as software applications that are subscribed to and accessed only through the Internet, and not installed on local PCs or laptops. Applications built by and accessed via Google fall into this category, as well as the many photo sites to which you can upload your pictures and videos, edit and share them with others. These solutions are gaining tremendous popularity, because end users do not need to install, update and maintain software locally – only connect to it and use it when the need arises.

Web 2.0 describes the whole of the social networking movement on the Internet, and includes but is not limited to destinations such as Facebook, MySpace, eHarmony, LinkedIn and Twitter. These sites offer the ability for people all over the world to share common interests, stay connected and learn more about each other – and these sites aren’t just for the young. Statistics show that the over 50 generation is logging onto these sites in greater numbers than ever before. In fact, in one month alone, Facebook adds over 17,000 new members.

The next time you are on the Internet and upload a photograph and use the online tools to modify that picture, you are participating in ‘cloud computing.’ The picture is probably loaded to a site that uses IaaS for their servers, PaaS in order to provide the visual interface in which you modify the photograph, and SaaS applications you’ll use to access your email program and social networking sites in order to send it to or post it for those with whom you would like to share the picture.

*Source: SPC International Online, Inc.

If you would like to know more, please contact us at 1-800-871-9683 for a free consultation. Also, if you do not have online BDR (backup-disaster-recovery) and anti-virus/malware protection for your business, please give us a call to help you implement the latest systems. Our email address is: markhuffman@creativebusinesstechnologies.com

5 Tips for creating a Business Continuity Plan for your Small Business

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Is your business prepared for any type of disaster? Even though small businesses may not have as many employees or as much equipment, they are still as vulnerable to disaster as a large corporation. If your business office were to be destroyed by a tornado, you could lose valuable business if you don’t plan ahead. Many businesses don’t want to take the time and the expense to prepare a business continuity plan, but can you really afford not to make one?*

  1. Make a List of All Possible Disasters. The best place to start is to list different types of disasters and try to determine what could be lost in each case, and what you can do to prevent that loss. A flood will require different strategies from a power outage or a fire. Next, try to estimate how long it would take, and how much it would cost, for you to get your business up and running again.
  2. Communication. The middle of a crisis is not the time to frantically search for phone numbers. Even small businesses need emergency contact numbers. Have all emergency contact numbers posted or programmed into every phone. Do you have an alternate mode of communication should your main phone lines shut down? Could your clients seamlessly contact you without ever knowing that your office was in the middle of disaster recovery? The same principle applies to email and fax. Making arrangements regarding communication are critical to keeping your business running smoothly. Communicating with staff and clients can mean the difference between complete shutdown, and a minimal business interruption.
  3. Preserving Your Data. In the event of a disaster, it is important to know that everything you need to function as a business is available. Identify all vital systems, documents, and data. While it is important for every business to back up their data on a regular basis, what if a fire destroyed your office? For this reason, offsite storage is critical to preserving your business’ valuable information. Offsite data storage allows to access to all of your stored data from any computer and from anywhere in the world.
  4. A Temporary Worksite. It is also important to plan for a temporary worksite. Depending on the goods or services your business offers, can you continue smooth operation if your office is shut down? Storing products in a second location can allow you to maintain your regular business schedule.
  5. Test Your Plan. One of the keys to successful disaster recovery is testing your business continuity plan on a regular basis. It is important that you and your staff know exactly what to do, where to go, and how to access the necessary items you need to keep your business running smoothly to the outside world, even if you are standing in the middle of a disaster. Schedule regular plan tests to ensure that everyone in your office is on the same page and ready should disaster strike. Hopefully, you will never have to use your business continuity plan, but it is smart business to be prepared for any emergency should one arise.

*Source: SPC International 2017.

If you would like to know more, please contact us at 1-800-871-9683 for a free consultation. Also, if you do not have online BDR (backup-disaster-recovery) and anti-virus/malware protection for your business, please give us a call to help you implement the latest systems. Our email address is: markhuffman@creativebusinesstechnologies.com

10 reasons MSP clients need a layered security strategy to stay safe

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They say recognizing a problem is the first step in solving it. But when it comes to cybersecurity, many small- and medium-sized businesses don’t believe they have a problem. Many simply believe that hackers will focus their attention exclusively on large and well-heeled organizations, and aren’t interested in smaller businesses. Unfortunately, this couldn’t be further from the truth, and this “it won’t happen to me” mentality leaves them highly susceptible to attacks.*

While some attacks do target large corporations, most still do not discriminate based on the size of organization. Hackers just want to compromise the network and its devices to steal any and all data they can sell or use for their own ends. And once they’ve hacked a network server, they can use it to launch attacks on others.

This means that, in our current, constantly evolving threat landscape, simply deploying an antivirus solution isn’t enough. Only a layered security strategy that includes multi-vector protection can successfully fend off advanced, zero-day threats like ransomware, malware, and more.

1. It’s not a matter of if your clients will get hacked, but when.
Many small businesses don’t invest sufficiently in IT security resources and protection. This may be due in part to the fact that they may not know they’re being targeted. According to the Ponemon Institute 2016 State of SMB Cybersecurity Report, hackers have breached 50% of the 28 million small businesses in the United States.

2. The threat landscape evolves constantly.
Trying to keep pace with the changing nature of cyber threats is a full time job in and of itself. Many small- to medium-sized businesses cannot afford the cost of full-time IT security staff, which is why it’s imperative that their MSP keep them protected from zero-day threats.

3. End users may not know security best-practices.
In the last year, phishing was involved in 90% of breaches, which makes end users both the weakest link and the first line of defense for SMBs. The best way to counter this threats to continually train and educate users on the risks their behaviors. A well-trained user base can help prevent threats like ransomware, drive-by downloads, keyloggers, and many more.

4. Lack of effective security policies and protocols.
Ensuring all passwords are strong and regularly changed is a given, but it should be supplemented with strong, two-factor authentication. Access rights to network files, folders, and file shares need to be tightly controlled to avoid malware wreaking havoc on networks.

5. Exposure to multi-vector attacks.
All the ways your clients’ users interact with the internet need to be considered, from emails, attachments, links, and browser, to web browsing and network activity. Effective endpoint security is vital to protecting all these vectors from cyberattacks. It should feature multi-vector protection to defend your clients from threats that use many different exploits to attack.

6. Complex security platforms create administration challenges.
Consider not only the costs of buying cybersecurity software, but also the operational expenses. Systems that integrate best-of-breed solutions and have a high degree of automation make security both more effective and more affordable. Plus, they make the administrator’s job much easier.

7. Out-of-date systems create vulnerabilities.
By following a rigorous patching regime, your clients can avoid many of the application vulnerabilities used to compromise networks. Patching can be an onerous process, but many automated services are available to make it easier, more effective, and more affordable. News-making breaches like WannaCry could have been avoided by simply patching.

8. No network visibility.
Having accurate information about your network (and what is connected to it) is vital in protecting it from both internal and external threats. Effective network monitoring tools can identify network anomalies and counter threats before they do damage.

9. Poor data backup practices.
Faced with attacks like ransomware, SMBs must have an effective back-up regime. Sixty percent of small companies that suffer a cyberattack are out of business within six months. There are many on and off-premise cloud-based backup systems that will help you avoid such a fate, as even paying the ransom these days is no guarantee you will get your data back.

10. Compliance issues.
Regulations affect many industries, and effective endpoint security is a routine compliance requirement. It is vital to understand your clients’ compliance obligations and ensure they have sufficient cybersecurity in place.

Many of the security issues raised in this list are solved by our Managed Services All-in-One Solutions that we provide for our clients. It gives SMBs the peace of mind to know they’re protected from threats like the ones above.

*Source: Webroot, Inc.

If you would like to know more, please contact us at 1-800-871-9683 for a free consultation. Also, if you do not have online BDR (backup-disaster-recovery) and anti-virus/malware protection for your business, please give us a call to help you implement the latest systems. Our email address is: markhuffman@creativebusinesstechnologies.com

Reasons Why You Should Upgrade Your Computer

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Computer users today, including business owners, are hanging onto to their old computer(s) (stand-alone, workstations and servers) when they should upgrade them. Many users are frustrated by the slow, erratic performance of their current systems and call a computer technician to fix the problem when it could be solved by simply upgrading to a later type system. This article will help you decide whether to hang onto what you have or “bite the bullet” and buy another computer.

Every Four Years is the usual point in time that you should look into purchasing a new computer. By this time, your current operating system has had many service packs and updates and sometimes this will slow down the performance of the computer, whether it is a laptop or desktop. Also, viruses and/or malware can cause damage to the operating system, requiring a complete system reload. If you are at the four year mark, you might want to consider upgrading instead of reloading.

Listed below is a list of reasons to upgrade:

CPU Speed: The Central Processing Unit is the “brains” of the computer and is in charge of how much data flows through the unit. The slower the CPU, the slower the data flow. Many times CPU bottlenecks of older systems prevent the unit from operating at an optimum level.

Hard Drive: The hard drive is where the operating system, programs and data reside on (unless the data is saved and backed up elsewhere). An older hard drive that uses platters for reading and writing data to it will be slower than a later model solid state device. Newer hard drives have very fast access speeds compared to older units.

Memory: Random Access Memory (RAM) determines how quickly the operating system, programs and data loads into the “memory” of the computer. Later model computers can handle and usually have greater amounts of memory to facilitate more robust computer operations.

System Board: The system board (otherwise known as the “motherboard”) will have different components on it (cache, chipset, etc.) that will help the computer to run more smoothly and efficiently. The newer the board, the better.

Microsoft Windows 10: If your company is still using computers that have Windows 7 or 8.1 operating systems, companies should upgrade to take advantage of the newest features that Microsoft has to offer. Please contact us if you need your operating system(s) or PC(s) upgraded.

IT Security: Security for your servers, workstations and stand-alone computers is of the upmost importance. Having the right security measures in place is absolutely necessary, especially with the rise of Ransomware. This includes Windows 10 being the dominant operating system within your organization.

These are the main reasons why you should upgrade your computer. The operating system and applications will run better on a newer system. Also, you can take advantage of newer programs (both cloud and non-cloud) that will work better on a newer system as well. Please let us know if you would like to speak to someone about upgrading your laptop, desktop, workstation or server.

If you would like to know more, please contact us at 1-800-871-9683 for a free consultation. Also, if you still have Windows 7 or 8 Computer(s) in your business, please give us a call to help you upgrade to Windows 10 and Office 365. Our email address is: markhuffman@creativebusinesstechnologies.com

4 Tips for getting the most out of your Technology Investment

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How many times have you purchased new software or hardware, and avoided the help menu or user manual? Experts reason that about 90 percent of all features included with software go unused! Much of this comes down to lack of training for individuals using the technology – they use what they know and need most, and avoid anything that would require study or practice to implement. Its human nature to take the path of least resistance, but with a little motivation you could better benefit from the money spent on technology for your business.*

How to get the most out of your Technology Investment

Instead of letting your technology investments continue on underutilized, here are 4 tips for getting the most out of your technology dollars:

1. Put the client in the driver’s seat of communication. You can improve the quality of customer service offered by your company through the use of simple technology. The more connected you are to your clients, the happier they are with your work. Use technology to give your clients a way to initiate discussion with you, either through blog interaction or a discussion forum. Set up instant messaging so clients can contact appropriate staff members as necessary. It’s simple technology, but will result in improved client retention, repeat customers and better communication.

2. Create a business culture of continuous improvement. One of the most amazing aspects of technology is how quickly it is updated and improved. Just when you think you have the best of the best, new technologies and processes are created to improve productivity. Even in the sometimes mundane office environments, new ideas will enhance efficiency and productivity. Encourage staff and consultants to let the new ideas flow – continuous improvement is the key for making the most out of your technology.

3. Take advantage of training opportunities. If the cost of sending staff to training courses is a bit much, and you’re unable to conduct monthly training seminars on your own – consider bringing in vendors and experts whenever a new version of software is released. You can also have managed service providers deliver training virtually as needed, in order to keep your staff up to date with the programs and tools used in the office.

4. Internal email newsletters with tips. Most businesses recognize the value of sending newsletters to their clients to keep in touch and establish relationships, but what about internal newsletters among staff members? Send a weekly email to your staff with a single technology tip that explains how to do something that will improve their productivity or make their lives a little easier. Keep it fun and add a cartoon or a quick quiz to keep the staff looking forward to their weekly newsletter. Your ideas for topics can come from training and seminars you attend, or from questions staff ask the IT department. If one person doesn’t understand something, there are probably a few others who also don’t understand – but aren’t speaking up about it.

*Source: SPC International 2017.

If you would like to know more, please contact us at 1-800-871-9683 for a free consultation. Also, if you do not have online BDR (backup-disaster-recovery) and anti-virus/malware protection for your business, please give us a call to help you implement the latest systems. Our email address is: markhuffman@creativebusinesstechnologies.com

Ransomware: The smart person’s guide

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In the past, security threats often involved scraping information from systems that could be used for other crimes such as identity theft. Now, criminal organizations have proceeded to directly demanding money from victims by holding their devices—and data—hostage. This trend of ransomware, in which data is encrypted and victims are prompted to pay for the key, has been growing rapidly since late 2013.*

What is ransomware?
Ransomware is a subclass of malware that is characterized by holding device control—and therefore locally stored data—for a ransom, which is typically paid using virtual currencies such as Bitcoin, though often premium SMS messaging and prepaid credit cards are alternative options. Sophisticated ransomware attacks employ disk or file-level encryption, making it impossible to recover files without paying the ransom demanded by the hackers.

Historically, ransomware has invoked law enforcement to coerce victims into paying—displaying warnings such as the FBI logo and a message indicating that illegal file sharing has been detected. More recently, the authors of ransomware payloads clearly indicate that a device has simply been hacked.

Ransomware payloads are typically distributed on file-sharing networks, but have also been distributed as part of a malvertising campaign on the Zedo ad network, as well as through phishing emails that disguise the payload as maliciously crafted images or as executables attached to emails.

For criminal organizations, the use of ransomware provides a very straight line from development to profit, as the comparatively manual labor of identity theft requires more resources. As such, the burgeoning growth of ransomware can be attributed to the ease of deployment, and a high rate of return relative to the amount of effort put forth.

For IT professionals, the risk of ransomware extends beyond desktops and notebook workstations, but has historically included smartphones and other connected computing devices, such as Synology NAS products and Android TV devices. While home users were traditionally the targets of ransomware, business networks have been increasingly targeted by criminals. Additionally, servers have become high-profile targets for ransomware attackers, as unpatched software makes systems vulnerable.

Who does ransomware affect?
In particular, healthcare service providers have been explicitly targeted in recent ransomware attacks, as well as public sector employees. Less sophisticated ransomware attacks purport to be able to restore your files after payment, though in reality the files are deleted whether users pay or not.

Ransomware attacks are generally quite successful for criminal organizations, as victims often pay the ransom. Specifically targeted attacks may result in increasingly higher ransom demands, as attackers become more brazen in their attempts to extort money from victims.

When is ransomware happening?
While the first rudimentary ransomware attack dates back to 1989, the first widespread encrypting ransomware attack was CryptoLocker, which was deployed in September 2013. Originally, victims of CryptoLocker were held to a strict deadline to recover their files, though the authors later created a web service that can decrypt systems for which the deadline has passed at the hefty price of 10 BTC (at the time of publication, the USD equivalent of 10 Bitcoin, or BTC, is approximately $5,787).

While the original CryptoLocker authors are thought to have made about $3 million USD, imitators using the CryptoLocker name have appeared with increasing frequency. The FBI’s Internet Crime Complaint Center estimates that between April 2014 and June 2015, victims of ransomware paid over $18 million USD to restore access to their devices.

How do I protect myself from a ransomware attack?
Ransomware is often spread in file-sharing networks or on websites that purport to provide direct downloads. Other traditional attack vectors have also been used, such as email attachments or malicious links. There are ways to protect against a potential infection. For enterprise workstation deployments, using Group Policy to prevent executing unknown programs is an effective security measure for ransomware and other types of malware.

We can recommend Cybersecurity Solutions that can protect your computers against ransomware or at least mitigate the effects of it.

*Source: Excerpts from TechRepublic’s Ransomware Smart Person’s Guide by James Sanders May 16th 2017.

If you would like to know more, please contact us at 1-800-871-9683 for a free consultation. Also, if you do not have online BDR (backup-disaster-recovery) and anti-virus/malware protection for your business, please give us a call to help you implement the latest systems. Our email address is: markhuffman@creativebusinesstechnologies.com

The high cost of recovery from a Security Breach

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Small to medium size businesses are what keep this country moving. Unfortunately, for many of these business owners, budgetary needs force them to make cuts that the mammoth corporations do not have to consider. These budget cuts can often result in reduced security and sub-par IT services that in the long run can end up costing the company even more money. Reacting to; and the recovery from, a security breach or attack always costs more after it has happened than what it would have cost to prevent it.*

This fact has been supported by recent surveys, and may come as a surprise to many small and mid-size companies who are under the false impression that hackers and other security threats target larger corporations. It has been discovered that companies that have less than 500 employees are actually more likely to be at risk of an attack or security breach than a larger corporation. Of course, this becomes a problem when the larger corporation has the resources to maintain higher levels of security at a time when smaller companies are dealing with restricted or; in some cases, frozen IT budgets.

The benefits of hiring a Managed IT Services Provider in preventing attacks and security breaches

With a security breach a real concern for small business owners, many are making the decision to bring on outside providers to address their IT needs. Managed services providers can offer an affordable solution to small business owners who are struggling to manage an internal IT staff. In some cases there isn’t even an IT person on staff, which can be just as costly for the small business when they have to bring in a professional on an as needed basis. Considering the money and time spent recovering from a security attack or breech, more business owners are realizing the cost of not having this level of protection is too high to pay. Here we look at how managed services providers can help business owners level the playing field against those who would infiltrate their security systems.

  1. Increased knowledge – Managed services providers are in the business of technology. They have trained staff who are able to prevent security breaches and spot any activity that could be perceived as a threat. Moreover, they have the expertise to stop threats and prevent the loss of sensitive and private information that can lead to costly recovery measures.
  2. Less expensive than in-house IT – Other IT professionals can provide the same security but it will cost much more to the business owner. What many owners are realizing is paying a flat monthly fee for security and other services provided by MSPs is actually much more cost effective than paying an internal IT staff or outsourcing based on incident.
  3. Proactive is better than reactive – The biggest benefit of having a quality managed services provider in your corner is the fact that you are acting in a proactive manner to ensure all of your systems are managed properly. This is less expensive and less time consuming than waiting for something bad to happen and then reacting.

Any small business can benefit from the security provided by a Managed IT Services provider. They can do so at a fraction of the cost, therefore eliminating the fear and unnecessary cost of trying to recover from a breech in security or attack.

*Source: SPC International Online, Inc.

If you would like to know more, please contact us at 1-800-871-9683 for a free consultation. Also, if you do not have online BDR (backup-disaster-recovery) and anti-virus/malware protection for your business, please give us a call to help you implement the latest systems. Our email address is: markhuffman@creativebusinesstechnologies.com

The Top 10 Benefits of Outsourcing IT through Managed Services

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Immediate benefits can be gained by outsourcing IT services through Managed Services.*

  1. Control IT Costs Outsourcing converts fixed IT costs into variable costs and allows you budget effectively. In other words, only pay for what you use when you need it.
  2. Reduce Labor Costs Hiring and training an IT staff can be very expensive, and temporary employees don’t always live up to your expectations. Outsourcing lets you focus your human resources where you need them most.
  3. Trained, Experienced, Qualified, Certified If you’re not IT trained, how do you assure an employee is qualified? Certifications like Microsoft Certified Systems Engineer (MCSE) are important, but so is experience.
  4. Qualified doesn’t Equal Experienced Few problems are new for leading IT service companies, which see related problems multiple times. An in-house IT employee leads an isolated existence no matter how much they train. We’d all rather an experienced doctor; the same is true for IT.
  5. Increase Efficiency and Competitiveness Organizations that try to do all IT Services in-house themselves can have much higher research, development, and implementation time, all of which increase costs and are ultimately passed on to customers.
  6. Quickly Implement New Technology A quality outsourced IT service organization will have the resources to start new projects right away. Handling the same project in-house might involve weeks or months to hire the right people, train them, and provide the support they need. For most implementations, quality IT companies will bring years of experience in the beginning saving time and money.
  7. Stay Focused on Your Core Business Businesses have limited resources, and every manager has limited time and attention. Outsourcing can help your business stay focused on your core business and not get distracted by complex IT decisions.
  8. Reduce risk Every business investment carries a certain amount of risk. Markets, competition, government regulations, financial conditions, and technologies all change very quickly. Outsourcing providers assume and manage much of this risk for you, with specific industry knowledge, especially security and compliance issues. They generally are much better at deciding how to avoid risk in their areas of expertise.
  9. Level the Playing Field Most small businesses can’t afford to match the in-house support services that larger companies maintain. Outsourcing can help small companies act “big” by giving them access to the similar technology, and expertise that large companies enjoy. An independent third party managed cost structure and economy of scale can give your company a competitive advantage.
  10. Compliance and Security Is your firewall up to date? Do you have a DMZ installed? Do you audit your Workstations and Servers? Has your company implemented PCI security standards and work to maintain those standards? For example, Businesses have more ways than ever to prosper by taking many forms of payments such as Credit and Debit Cards, Gift Certificates, E-Checks, Wire Transfers to name a few, but with these forms of transacting also comes the need for due diligence. By outsourcing a qualified Manages Services company who is familiar with PCI Compliance standards https://www.pcisecuritystandards.org, you can rest assured that your company is minimizing the risks associated with maintaining client data, credit card numbers, sensitive competitive information and more.

*Sources: © 2017 Essent Corporation

If you would like to know more, please contact us at 1-800-871-9683 for a free consultation. Also, if you do not have online BDR (backup-disaster-recovery) and anti-virus/malware protection for your business, please give us a call to help you implement the latest systems. Our email address is: markhuffman@creativebusinesstechnologies.com